Do You Really Want A Unique Patient ID?

The House just passed a bill that eliminates the prohibition on the use of federal funding to assign all Americans a unique medical identifier. Former Congressman Ron Paul, M.D., got that prohibition enacted in 1998.

            The identifier is supposed to improve “efficiency”—of what? Government surveillance of all Americans? The agenda of government-favored special interests, who might want to silence persons with political views they don’t like? Persons who might see you as a threat to their success in business, academia, or other ventures?

            What might be in your record? A prescription for Valium or other drug prescribed during a distressing life crisis? This could be a psychiatric “red flag” causing denial of your gun rights. A diagnosis of a sexually transmitted disease? An admission that you had a temper tantrum or used an illegal drug at a party? Could this derail a job application or cause you to lose child custody or foreclose a political career?

            Can you be honest with your doctor if anything in the record might someday be used against you?

            “Make no mistake. The [patient identifier] would be the end of privacy and the foundation of a national health data system,” warns Twila Brase, president of the Citizens’ Council for Health Freedom and author of Big Brother in the Exam Room.

            The damaging information in the record might not even be yours. A hurried data-entry person might have clicked the wrong item on a drop-down menu or even cut-and-pasted something from another patient’s electronic health record.

            The prohibition on funding for the unique identifier needs to be restored, states the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons (AAPS).

Further information:

       

Insurance Contracts that Respect the Patient – Physician Relationship?

Friend of IP4PI Charles “Chip” Smutny, DO writes in:

Does anyone think about or have we even tried to come up with our own physician based contract proposal to insurers that could be a way of negotiating our independence as an alternative to their railroading contracts? Since we know that DPC works, cost less and provides better care more efficiently and that insurance will morph to continue to keep its revenue stream, perhaps we should offer up a contract of our own.

Since we don’t like their offer should we have a counter proposal that requests what we want in a legal document that can be validated and support legal recourse in “a partners agreement” instead of the current “employee-employer contract” and that the insurers must be accountable to in court to this new contract?

Simply stated it might read something like this (with 11 pages of legalese from our lawyers that structures the responsibilities and supports the clarity of the following):

  • patients come first
  • physicians have a right to receive pay for services rendered.
  • insurers pay patients according to their contracts, not physicians
  • patients pay physicians directly
  • patients have the right to decide what they will accept as personal risk in their health and in their financial circumstances.
  • insurers may not interfere in any way with the decision making of the patient in concert with the physician.
  • insurers may not set pricing restrictions on physicians. They may however set limitations in their service contract with the patient on what they will cover in their contract.
  • physicians have the privilege and the right to support their patients in their efforts to obtain quality healthcare delivery and insurance coverage
  • physicians have the right to personal privacy and protect patient privacy by only allowing data stripped of unique identifiers to be collected and stored centrally.   Centralized charting must not contain any unique identifiers other than the physicians delivery of care office information.

Please add on or discuss as you see fit!

This discussion might lead to some sort of standardized counter offer to insurers since so many physicians are afraid to leave that system which has steadily moved toward indentured servitude.

Three Simple Steps CMS Can Take To Save Medicare for our Children

Dear Mr. Slavitt:

CMS can be the hero that saves Medicare for our children and grandchildren by simply starting out with these three steps:

1. Take the handcuffs off solo and small practices, which are the most efficient, productive, effective and inexpensive healthcare facilities available.
http://www.aafp.org/news/practice-professional-issues/20140820smallpractstudy.html

The stated goal of MACRA MIPS is to make care more available, inexpensive and productive. Per government data published in Medical Economics, 89% of solo practices will get hit with penalties and a majority of small practices of less than 10 physicians, some 110,00 physicians, will be also be penalized. All solo and small practices are potentially vulnerable to bankruptcy due to MACRA.
http://medicaleconomics.modernmedicine.com/medical-economics/news/your-voice-frustrations-quality-metrics-remain-intact Continue reading

Calling all Citizens About Your Rights, Privacy & Healthcare Options 

For Urgent Consideration and Action

This letter is from The National Physician’s Council on Healthcare Policy, or NPCHCP. We are a national organization comprised of physicians from many different specialties from a majority of states. In 2009 the Council was established by members of the US Congress for the purpose of gathering practicing physician’s input on issues relating to medicine, surgery and government healthcare policy.

The Council has read and critiqued the nine hundred and sixty two pages (962) of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, or CMS Rules spawned from the MACRA Law. By unanimous opinion, even if the stated goals were laudable, the MACRA Rules as written are impossible to implement and will, like the “so-called,’ Affordable Care Act,” or ACA, waste billions of taxpayer dollars and violate your rights to privacy, security and choiceif they are allowed to proceed forward.

MACRA/MIPS will destroy your privacy, security and healthcare options, taking out the solo and small groups first as physicians buckle under MACRA’s financial burden and become salaried employees or leave practice. Implementation will force physicians by law to betray the Hippocratic Oath by linking payment to the collection of intimate and private data on all patients, not just Medicare and Medicaid enrollees. All data must be made available without restriction to CMS and related government entities via the electronic medical record, per the regulations, endangering your privacy and security. The government and insurance industry are exempted from HIPAA, the so-called, “privacy statute.” Further, mandatory reporting and participation by physicians and healthcare facilities is to be used for bureaucrats to publically grade physicians on the pretense of quality. MACRA MIPS will not pay for your healthcare office visits to physicians and facilities, but by a complex series of equations based on your personal, formerly private data. The government is free and clear to ration care by choking payment to death for certain procedures, groups or even individuals as they see fit, with no responsibility to the people it is purported to serve.

In 1965, Medicare was passed with the distinct caveat that the law would in no way interfere with the practice of medicine and surgery. In contrast, the MACRA law allows total government intrusion into every aspect of the practice of medicine, including unfettered access to every person’s personal health data. This includes not just Medicare recipients, but all insured persons, whether individual, corporate or government. This law actually extends CMS reporting requirements to individual privately insured, employer sponsored, as well as, government Medicare and Medicaid patients also. This will most certainly be challenged in court.

The frequent justification for government interference is that the current healthcare expenditures cannot be sustained. Under the auspices of enhancing quality, fixing a flawed payment system and controlling costs, Congress passed another healthcare law few had read. Ironically, the MACRA solution adds billions of dollars in IT, administrative, and software costs to physicians and the taxpayers. At the same time the law takes physicians away from the care of patients. The only winners are policians, IT vendors, hospitals, big pharma and entities selling compliance courses and software. With strong opposition, we can stop MACRA during this CMS Rules Comment Period.

The WSJ on May 7, 2016 reported that Washington rules now impose $1.9 trillion of annual costs to the US economy, or $15,000 per household. Smaller business is the hardest hit. It is our opinion that every taxpaying citizen has an obligation to protect their own self interests of privacy, security and freedom of choice.

We urge you to voice opposition to this government takeover of your privacy, freedom of choice, and healthcare options during the CMS MACRA comment period prior to June 27, 2016. We all can and must do better. 

Here is where you may make your comments:

https://www.regulations.gov/#!submitComment;D=CMS-2016-0060-0068

The NPCHCP thanks you for all your help. Let’s take back our rights and freedom NOW.

The Wolves Are Leading the Sheep

Medical records were created by doctors for the use of themselves and their associates and their consultants…..AND FOR NO OTHER REASON

The purpose of medical records is to maintain quality health care for the benefit of the patient, to provide a doctor personal recall, and to simplify the sharing of information between the patient’s various doctors.

Sharing medical records with attorneys, government officials, and insurance companies, if tested, is probably illegal under the rules of medical privacy.

Many years ago, I proposed that doctors stop treating attorneys. I suggested that the medical malpractice problem would be rapidly solved if we did so.

Maybe if we stopped sending in all of these medical records, we could do away with the royal mess that has been created.

ICD-10 joins MOC and MOL as another nail in the coffin of medicine.

Unfortunately, with the apathy that exists, the wolves will continue to lead the sheep to the slaughterhouse.

Robert S Maurer, D.O., Edison, NJ

AAPSonline.org submits amicus brief to US Court to protect privacy of patient medical records.

Following the information that AAPS submitted an amicus brief to the United States Court of Appeals fifth circuit to block the federal government from accessing and releasing unauthorized patient medical records, independent physicians for patient independence sent the following email to the American Medical Association and the American Osteopathic Association today:
Perhaps the American Medical Association and The American Osteopathic Association can also take the lead on filing an amicus brief to restore the sacrosanct patient privacy of their medical records. Currently the government is gathering and freely sharing data without regard for individual patient privacy. Last month, the government agency that performs security checks was breached of 21 million government employees records. Need I say more?

Privacy is a big problem getting bigger every day

Guest Post from Barbara Duck – @MedicalQuack

Privacy is a big problem getting bigger every day where its technology basically used against the consumer in the form of their data. With my background of both sales and developing, I have two thought processes going all the time if you will, the geek side visualizes and the sales side visualizes how they will market and potentially deceive the public with a lot of it to get folks on board so they can collect more data.

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