Forget Pens, How About Banning Kickbacks?

Back in 2008 the Pharmaceutical industry ostensibly took the high road and called for a moratorium on branded items handed out to doctors. No more free pens. Then in 2010 the Physician Payment Sunshine Act cemented in place red tape impeding other gifts to physicians. No more free lunches … with out filling out a form for Uncle Sam.

Well the truth is: “We’ve got big problems in health care, and I don’t think the problem is pens,” stated Houston physician Stephen Lapin, MD, speaking what was on the mind of virtually, if not literally, every physician.

These changes didn’t accomplish much if anything but a few warm fuzzy feelings for politicians, while the folks in C-Suites likely congratulated each other with a slap on the back for yet again shifting the blame onto doctors and covering up their own corruption.

This time doctors are fighting back and asking for real change, change with the potential to save patients to the tune of $100 billion dollars. How? By axing out the Pharmaceutical industry kickbacks being used to bribe the middlemen in control of American’s pharmaceutical benefits.

Your action is needed by July 16 to help end these improper bribes that are driving up costs, creating shortages, and controlling the prescriptions covered by your plan.

Speaking out is easy and instructions can be found here: https://aapsonline.org/alert-and-special-legislative-update-pharmacy-benefits-managers/.

 

Advertisements

Can a Former Pharma Insider Solve Sky High Rx Costs?

HHS Secretary Alex Azar talked a good game in a Rose Garden ceremony and subsequent press conference‚ÄĒheld Friday, May 11‚ÄĒon Trump Administration efforts to lower prescription drug costs for American patients.

Azar is, of course, a former executive of Eli Lilly. Can he be trusted to champion the interests of everyday Americans?

We will soon find out.¬† President Trump stated that Sec. Azar’s insider knowledge about the complex schemes to raise prices, perpetrated by industry middlemen, is exactly what makes him the right person for the job.

Watch the video of the Rose Garden Ceremony:

Although groups like Physicians Against Drug Shortages have been sounding the alarm for years, industry-led smoke and mirrors have, until recently, largely flown under the radar of the main-stream-media. Thankfully, respected outlets like the Wall Street Journal and Washington Times are now beginning to shine needed light on this malfeasance.

As these articles explain, a safe harbor to Medicare anti-kickback law is the major policy failure enabling the bad actors to line their pockets by driving up costs. The safe harbor legalizes kickbacks paid by manufacturers to Pharmacy Benefit Managers (PBMs) and their cousins-in-crime Group Purchasing Organizations (GPOs).

TownHall.com reports: Repealing the GPO/PBM safe harbor to Medicare anti-kickback law “would open the drug and medical supply segment of healthcare to free market competition and foster innovation. In addition, it would result in cost reductions estimated at $100 billion [actually more like $200 billion], including savings for the Medicare and Medicaid programs.”

Congress initially enacted the GPO safe harbor in 1986. Then in 1987 Congress reaffirmed the measure, instructed HHS to implant the the safe harbor into regulation, and granted HHS authority to create additional safe harbors. In 2003 HHS OIG issued guidance clearing the way for PBMs to piggyback on the GPO safe harbor. Such guidance could theoretically be revised or rescinded by the HHS Secretary, without needing action by Congress.

And in their remarks today, both Trump and Azar mentioned that they will be looking at reining in such abusive practices.

Later in the press room, Azar explained that there are perverse incentives at play: “These big price increases are actually a good deal for pharmacy benefit managers, who are supposed to keep prices down.”

Video of White House Press Conference With Sec. Azar:

What is HHS going to do? They put out a 44-page blueprint of their plan:

https://www.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/AmericanPatientsFirst.pdf

One step HHS announced it will implement immediately is a prohibition of Part D gag clauses, “preventing pharmacists‚Äô¬†telling patients when they¬†could pay less out-of-pocket¬†by not using insurance.”

Great words but let’s hope HHS doesn’t stop there.¬†The blueprint is less clear about other action HHS will take related to PBMs, although it states HHS is considering:¬†¬†“Measures to restrict the use¬†of rebates, including revisiting¬†the safe harbor under the Anti-Kickback¬†statute for drug rebate.”

Rebates? Why does CMS use that euphemism? They are not rebates, they are legalized kickbacks.  Furthermore, rebates do not go to the patients, they flow to the PBM and insurance companies.

Unfortunately, HHS has a poor track record when it comes to using it’s existing authority to stop PBM abuse. The Government Accountability Office reports: “since 2004, [HHS] has not routinely exercised its authority to request and review disclosures” that PBMs are required to make available to comply with the safe harbor.

HHS promises there will be an opportunity for the public to comment through a “Request for Information.”

HHS appears to be asking the right questions, including:

“Do PBM rebates and fees based on¬†the percentage of the list price create¬†an incentive to favor higher list¬†prices (and the potential for higher¬†rebates) rather than lower prices?”

and

“Should PBMs be obligated to act solely in the interest of the entity for¬†whom they are managing pharmaceutical¬†benefits? Should PBMs be¬†forbidden from receiving any payment¬†or remuneration from manufacturers,¬†and should PBM contracts¬†be forbidden from including rebates¬†or fees calculated as a percentage of¬†list prices? What effect would imposing¬†this fiduciary duty on PBMs¬†on behalf of the ultimate payer (i.e.,
consumers) have on PBMs‚Äô ability to¬†negotiate drug prices?”

When details become available about the comment opportunity we will ask that all patients and doctors demand that HHS take strong action to stop the PBM and GPO kickbacks.

Ultimately, as Trump stated in his comments, Congress will need to do it’s part in concert with administration actions.¬† One priority for Congress must be to repeal the GPO/PBM safe harbor and end legalized kickbacks.

In the meantime HHS can lead the way to educate Americans on how such repeal will save $200 billion dollars/year and prevent dangerous drug shortages.

Americans are depending on you to do the right thing, Secretary Azar.