The Progress and Consequences of the ACGME Merger: A Call for Action©

“The profession should reverse course [on ACGME merger], continue to maintain its own osteopathic graduate medical education system, fix the existing problems with that system, expand it, innovate with it, particularly by developing ambulatory-based programs which reflect the reality of clinical practice,” writes Dr. Norman Gevitz in his call to action published today.  Click here to this important article.

Dr. Gevitz is Professor of the History and Sociology of Medicine & Senior Vice President—Academic Affairs, AT Still University. He is the author of more than 50 peer-reviewed publications including The DOs: Osteopathic Medicine in America 2nd edition (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2004).

Additional Related Resources:

An Open Letter from the AACOM Executive Committee in Response to Dr. Gevitz’s previous call for action.
Letter To Medical Economics from Craig M. Wax, DO

Back to Puke, Purge and Blister ?

Since 1888 when the first Osteopath put forth the Principles of Osteopathy and a comprehensive therapeutic program that was much more than puke, purge and blister which was the practice of “Medicine” at that time and as a result was run out of Kansas and went to Kirksville MO where he established the first College of Osteopathy and after 6 years began the American Osteopathic Association which is now in the process of ending the degree of DO and sending all graduates of DO colleges of Osteopathic Medicine to ACGME programs approved by the ABMS and they will certified by the ABMS boards and there will be no more Osteopaths.

I am astounded by the apathy of practicing DO;s and an apparent lack of concern. There are many who think that they should unite with the Allopaths especially in acquiring Board certification. I have been a DO

since 1961 and was a practicing “Internist followed by cardiology and then an MD fellowship in rheumatology completed in 1971. In this time I have been threatened by a malpractice suit 5 times and these were never litigated. I practice rheumatology full time and will do so until my demise. We practice the highest standards of healthcare provision and currently have students rotating from 3 DO schools and 2 MD schools. The
students are astounded by the way we practice as we practice Osteopathy that is far advanced from that which is currently taught at Osteopathic Colleges of Osteopathic medicine. They are seeing patients that revere our way of practice.

We are putting all we can muster in establishing The American Association of Osteopathic Physicians and plan on being Osteopaths in our organization. We have established American Boards of Osteopathic Specialties to provide certification in all specialties. We are interested in how many may join us.

Charles L. Clay DO

I’m a DO, and it is a beautiful thing. We must keep our identity.

Dr. Gina Reghetti shares her thoughts on preserving the practice of osteopathic medicine and formation of an alternative D.O. board:

We must fight the system that wants to change a good thing. Osteopathy needs to stay unchanged, and it needs to be practiced as it was practiced in the past, without insurance involvement because it is the big corporate insurance companies that just couldn’t understand our language so they have attempted to destroy it. Harvard has dealt us serious blows because it’s the allopathic profession that is clueless to the medical practice of Osteopathy, yet they are the ones in positions to judge, and define reimbursement for an area of medicine that they just don’t know. We are not allopathic physicians, and we never will be, and never care to be so we need to stop holding DOs to the same standards as the MDs were trained. We are not trained the same that is why we don’t take the same boards; we are very different!

We must keep our identity especially when big government and national medical organizations are forcing us down one pathway. Continue reading

Buyer’s remorse for H.R. 2 – MACRA, SGR “Fix”

Dr. Chip writes in:

The two lines in the entire argument made in this article“The repeal of the SGR is the carrot; the far-reaching payment reforms that the legislation facilitates are the stick,” is the basis of the discussion we wanted to initiate nearly 4 years ago both at the house of delegates and in discussion through our own Publications in “Saving Private Osteopathic Medicine.” All our journals refused to publish our position for an invitation to have a discussion in a public forum AND NOT BEHIND CLOSED DOORS. Promises were made and never kept. Tyranny reins under circumstances like these. Continue reading

No Replacement For The Osteopathic Approach To A Healthy State Of Wellness

Medicine At Its Finest  By Gina Reghetti, D.O.

I will focus on the Osteopathic Medicine Primary Care approach to attempt to explain the dismantlement  of  medicine.  It is my professional opinion that the Corporate developers of the Health Industries’ Electronic Automated Technologies believe that they have developed technology smart enough to replace the role of doctors in general, and specifically, the role of the Osteopathic Physicians from their noble profession of medicine.  Specifically, the focus will be on the total dismantlement, and removal of the Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons from healthcare entirely; for no other reason other than the Osteopathic Medicine Primary Care approach works.

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Letter to the AACOM Society of Osteopathic Medical Educators (SOME)

Long response to the following question posed after completion of a national conference:

What educational projects can SOME sponsor that will be of benefit to your campus, and the profession?

One of the most perplexing issues that continues to face the profession remains full faced and largely un-addressed in the literature and in research today largely because there has not been a concerted effort to define the Distinctiveness of Osteopathic Medicine on its own terms. What has been promulgated through all our education programs is that DO ≠ MD + OMM.

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Single accreditation for MDs and DOs by 2020?

Dr. Gina Reghetti comments on Dr. Wax’s letter to AOA (also copied below):

Dr Wax,

I hope he answers back. I wish that we could find an attorney that would file suit due to them restricting our unique trade of Osteopathic Medicine, a national historical healthcare system, that originated in America.

The agenda is definitely against the American way. Osteopathic Medicine, cannot be classified together with Allopathic Medicine. There has to be something that can be filed legally.

Look how far the NPs and PAs have come, yet we are taking another step back to discrimination years ago when DOs weren’t considered doctors. How can this be?

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