Poll: How Much Time, Money Do You Spend on MOC?

Via Medical Economics:

A new study has set out to quantify the time and cost many internists and internal medicine (IM) subspecialists will spend to meet the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) maintenance of certification (MOC) requirements. Over the course of 10 years, a 35% increase in fees and 26% increase in hours spent was found.

The study also found when the dollar value of physician time is added to MOC fees, internists and IM subspecialists will spend $23,607.

ABIM President Richard Baron, MD, disputed the study’s assumption that continuing medical education (CME) credits will only amount to 25% of the requirements. Baron said that CME could easily satisfy 100%, not 25%, of the requirements.

Medical Economics asks: Do these numbers accurately reflect an increase in the time and money you expect to spend on MOC over the next 10 years?

Give YOUR feedback in short poll at: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/849196

Viewpoint of Abandoning MOC Deserves Discussion & Publication

Paul Kempen, MD, PhD writes Howard Bauchner, Editor-in-Chief JAMA

Dear Dr Bauchner,

While you have taken great care to include various viewpoints on ways to perform MOC, you have never allowed a viewpoint that argues for abandoning MOC entirely. Instead, you use Tierstein and Topol’s work as an “opposing view” on MOC when, in fact, it is another permutation of the same concept-only industrial competition has invited this view. Therefore, I respectfully ask you to consider publishing a perspective piece (“viewpoint”) that makes a case for abandoning the “MOC” program entirely in lieu of a more conventional CME model. I would also emphasize the difference Between MOC and CME is that CME is self-directed and MOC is centrally-directed — hence, a VERY different concept that has large patient care ramifications (and not to mention the recently documented by the very salesmen of this product (ABIM/ABMS, Etc) to have been a mistake). Continue reading

LEAD BY EXAMPLE, not by words or emails!

Dr. Steven Horvitz – writes in

I am getting tired of all the bitching and moaning, yet everyone still continues to bend over and get sodomized day in and day out by third parties, government regulations and even worse our own physician societies.

Words, words and more words and yet it only gets worse.

Our patients think we are crying wolf because what actions have we taken to prove we mean what we say?

If you do not act, just forget about it and be assimilated.

Possible actions:

1- Opt out of all insurers. Don’t play their game.

2- Resign from the physician societies that have been screwing you.

3- Get a position in the societies and change them.

4- Start our own physician organizations and bring other docs fed up with the system over to ours. Strength in numbers only if walking the walk!!

5- Retire. I hear WalMart is hiring greeters again.

6- Run for political office and then DO NOT get altered by the system. Politicians think they are the system. Unless we fight back they will continue to think that way.

7- Treat every one of your patients like they were your family and get their support for any and all of the above that you have changed.

Other than that keep just sending emails and keep digging your own grave.

Nobody likes complainers. Our patients will not follow complainers, but they will follow and support leaders.

LEAD BY EXAMPLE, not by words or emails!

Steven Horvitz DO

“It is up to us,” writes Doc Chip

Guest Post from Dr. Chip Smutny

Folks,

Physician history has been to turn away from that which we don’t like and leave it alone. That brought us to where we are today.

That has to change now if we are to survive.

The way the government works in 2015 is by money first, period. We need to address that as a group. We might call this government now a Democratic Republic run by lobbyists, not voters. Continue reading

@KevinMD, you are missing the big picture

Dr. Daniel Craviotto – author of WSJ article “A Doctor’s Declaration of Independence” – responds to Dr. Kevin Pho’s article on Kevin MD “MOC is medicine’s self-inflicted wound

Kevin, you are missing the big picture. There are many issues that confront physicians and American health care. But why all the angst now? What has pushed us over the edge? Why now? There is a common denominator here. Those of us who are clinicians and in the active practice of medicine feel that we are being told by those outside of medicine how to practice medicine, how to use an EMR, what is meaningful in an EMR and how to be certified. For those outside of medicine – how dare you. Continue reading

ABIM CEO Richard Baron, MD faces Pennsylvania Physicians

Earlier this month (December 2014) ABIM President and CEO Richard Baron, MD took the stage to defend MOC before a group of PA physicians overwhelmingly opposed to MOC in a debate hosted by the Pennsylania Medical Society. (Note: PAMED has taken a strong stand against mandatory MOC.) PAMED has made a video of the debate available so you can see what you missed:

baron-thumb

Online Ratings Not Associated with Quality, Claims ABIM

Dr. Paul Kempen writes in with an expose on the latest self-serving “research” from the ABIM:

In spite of three main authors writing this we also read this nonsense-this is a paid ad for the ABIM brand of attestation which incidentally was used as the “standard.” Time to write some letters!

Study concept and design: Gray, Gao,McCullough, Lipner.

Acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data: All authors.

Drafting of the manuscript: Gray, Vandergrift, McCullough, Lipner.

Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: All authors.

Statistical analysis: Gray, Vandergrift, McCullough, Lipner.

Administrative, technical, or material support: Vandergrift, Gao, Lipner.
Study supervision: Gray, Lipner.

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: Drs Gray and Lipner and Mr Vandergrift are
paid employees at the American Board of Internal Medicine.

Funding/Support: The American Board of Internal Medicine provided financial
and material support for this study. This study was partially supported by
National Science Foundation Career Award 1254021 (Dr Gao).

Role of the Funder/Sponsor: The American Board of Internal Medicine had no
role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis,
and interpretation of the data; preparation, review, or approval of the
manuscript; and decision to submit the manuscript for publication.