Physician plan to prevent and combat #Ebola virus

Craig M Wax DO, Family physician and talk show host, and David Condoluci DO infectious disease specialist have a common sense plan for United States and all municipalities to prevent spread and to combat the deadly #Ebola virus.

1. Close borders to #Ebola endemic countries and their people until such time the disease is prevented or cured.
2. Do not fly planes to #Ebola endemic countries except for humanitarian drops of supplies, medicine and food. No planes landing in #Ebola endemic nations.
3. Screening at all airports for history, signs and symptoms of #Ebola disease.
4. Do teaching to all healthcare entities, physicians and nurses for prudent preventive, isolation and treatment techniques.
5. Study those patients who survived Ebola infection to determine what factors played a role in their survival and can be reproduced for #Ebola infected patients.
6. Connect and get consults of leading infectious disease physicians and nurses to develop prevention, detection and treatment standards.
7. Create and maintain situational awareness at all times especially when traveling or if a health care worker caring for patients.
8. Educate the public on all known #Ebola facts and all of the above in simple terms so they may all may act responsibly to prevent disease spread.

Best wishes for good health,
Craig M. Wax, DO
Family physician, Editorial Board of Medical Economics
Host of Your Health Matters
Rowan Radio 89.7 WGLS FM
http://wgls.rowan.edu/?feed=YOUR_HEALTH_MATTERS
Twitter @drcraigwax
Exec. Dir, Independent Physicians For Patient independence @IP4PI
IP4PI.wordpress.com

Dr. Snyderman violates Ebola quarantine

According to CNN and NBC, Dr. Nancy Snyderman—pediatrician and media reporter—and crew recently returned from a reporting trip from Liberia to find their cameraman contracted Ebola. At that time, they voluntarily agreed to a CDC and New Jersey health department recommended 21-day quarantine in their homes. However, Dr. Snyderman and other members of the team violated their quarantine.

Craig M Wax, DO, family physician, talk show host, exec director of IP4PI-Independent Physicians for Patient Independence, is recommending that the NJ Board of Medical Examiners investigate removing the medical license from Dr. Nancy Snyderman, and NBC consider discharging her from her job as a medical reporter and anchor for her actions this week. Dr. Wax says, “Dr. Snyderman and her crew reportedly violated their quarantine and subjected local residents to Ebola exposure; a potentially deadly virus. She and her crew accepted the assignment willingly, understanding all of the risks. She and her crew accepted the voluntary quarantine for the good of public health and risk containment for 21 days. She then volitionally violated it at a local restaurant, possibly conferring risks to other patrons and staff. This is a violation of both her oath of Hippocrates and public health law. She should be investigated, and if the investigation determines her actions warrant it, she should lose her medical license(s) and lose her job at NBC media. She has carelessly violated the first rule in being a physician, “primum non nocere,” first, do no harm. It is sad that such an educated long time exponent of children’s health has acted this irresponsibly.”

Per Eric Shore, DO, JD, MBAThe issue is very simple and non-negotiable. Ebola is not very contagious, but highly infectious. Any actual contact MUST be considered direct contact and the individual isolated until the incubation period has passed. Dr. Snyderman knew all of this, she accepted the risk when she went to Africa, and should have accepted and abided by the quarantine as well. The probability that she would spread Ebola was very small, BUT NOT ZERO! I agree with Dr. Wax, it is an issue that the State Board or Medicine should review.

MOS testifies: licensure should never be tied to use of EHR or MU

Testimony Submitted To the Board of Registration in Medicine In Support of Proposed Changes to 243 CMR 2.01(4), 2.02 and 2.06

October 3, 2014

Submitted by William M. Foley, DO on behalf of the Massachusetts Osteopathic Society (MOS)

As president of the Massachusetts Osteopathic Society, I have been asked by our board to write this public comment.  The MOS wishes to go on record in supporting these changes.  The MOS understands the background of this legislation and will support all proposals that have a positive impact on care in the Commonwealth.

The MOS believes that licensure should never be tied to use of electronic health records (EHR) or “meaningful use”. There is little to no evidence showing that using an EHR improves patient care or clinical outcomes.  As physicians, we should be given the right to choose what is best for our patients based on the best evidence currently available and strongly support evidence based medicine.  Legislative mandates have increased for medical licensure with little debate or consideration of the evidence or cost benefit analysis.

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