AOA’s Problematic Response to President Trump’s Executive Order

Friend of IP4PI, Richard Koss, D.O., writes in:

Below is the response from the AOA regarding the recent presidential executive order regarding Medicare.

Well they do make some accurate points towards the end of the letter there are many problems and issues that need to be brought out.

First. The federal government like most of America do not know what a DO or osteopathy is. Since this is a presidential executive order, does the President of the United States even know what osteopathy is? I doubt it! therefore the bureaucrats in Washington DC will not pay attention to this letter.

Second. The AOA does not speak for the 145,000 DO’s in this country. They can only speak for their membership which at this point is below 30% of all DO’s. since the AOA has not brought this information out to the membership and asked for support they cannot speak for any DO at this point. Likewise only 15% of MDs belong to the AMA. And again the AMA cannot speak for the vast majority of physicians in this country. Yet they do.

Third. Where in this response letter does the AOA expound on the difference between allopathic and osteopathic physician’s? And show our superiority in quality, cost containment etc. based on OSTEOPATHIC PRINCIPLES! Where does the AOA champion the use of osteopathic manipulative medicine in the care for seniors.

Interstate licensure Compact…NO!

Continue reading

Resolved: End Re-certification Abuse

Resolution on Re-Certification Sent to NJAOPS HOD

To:       Robert Bowen, Executive Director, NJAOPS

Paul Morris, D.O. Speaker of the House, NJAOPS
Robert Pedowitz, D.O.,President, NJAOPS
Michelina Desantis, D.O., President-Elect, NJAOPS
Ira Monka, D.O., Member, AOA Board of Trustees
Al Talone, D.O., Chairman, JOPAC

Re:        Proposed Resolution on Re-Certification

Date:    Feb 10, 2016

RESOLUTION

Whereas Board Certification was always intended to be a one time accomplishment based upon completion of a course of intensive training, clinical experience and study, followed by an examination and Continue reading

Back to Puke, Purge and Blister ?

Since 1888 when the first Osteopath put forth the Principles of Osteopathy and a comprehensive therapeutic program that was much more than puke, purge and blister which was the practice of “Medicine” at that time and as a result was run out of Kansas and went to Kirksville MO where he established the first College of Osteopathy and after 6 years began the American Osteopathic Association which is now in the process of ending the degree of DO and sending all graduates of DO colleges of Osteopathic Medicine to ACGME programs approved by the ABMS and they will certified by the ABMS boards and there will be no more Osteopaths.

I am astounded by the apathy of practicing DO;s and an apparent lack of concern. There are many who think that they should unite with the Allopaths especially in acquiring Board certification. I have been a DO

since 1961 and was a practicing “Internist followed by cardiology and then an MD fellowship in rheumatology completed in 1971. In this time I have been threatened by a malpractice suit 5 times and these were never litigated. I practice rheumatology full time and will do so until my demise. We practice the highest standards of healthcare provision and currently have students rotating from 3 DO schools and 2 MD schools. The
students are astounded by the way we practice as we practice Osteopathy that is far advanced from that which is currently taught at Osteopathic Colleges of Osteopathic medicine. They are seeing patients that revere our way of practice.

We are putting all we can muster in establishing The American Association of Osteopathic Physicians and plan on being Osteopaths in our organization. We have established American Boards of Osteopathic Specialties to provide certification in all specialties. We are interested in how many may join us.

Charles L. Clay DO

A Physician Overcomes His Addiction to Third-Party Money

Guest post from Steven Horvitz, DO

I am solo Family practice in southern New Jersey.

Back in 2006 I saw the writing on the wall that solo docs were in trouble. Revenues were stagnant due to insurer fee schedule reduction, yet expenses kept rising. My practice style does not fare well with quick visits so adjusting my practice to a treat-em and street-em quickly was not in my plans.

In 2005 United Healthcare and First Health insurers were creating issues with referrals and formularies and since I did not have a large percentage of those patients I dropped those plans. Most of those patients either switched insurance to remain with me or paid me my cash fee. Continue reading

I’m a DO, and it is a beautiful thing. We must keep our identity.

Dr. Gina Reghetti shares her thoughts on preserving the practice of osteopathic medicine and formation of an alternative D.O. board:

We must fight the system that wants to change a good thing. Osteopathy needs to stay unchanged, and it needs to be practiced as it was practiced in the past, without insurance involvement because it is the big corporate insurance companies that just couldn’t understand our language so they have attempted to destroy it. Harvard has dealt us serious blows because it’s the allopathic profession that is clueless to the medical practice of Osteopathy, yet they are the ones in positions to judge, and define reimbursement for an area of medicine that they just don’t know. We are not allopathic physicians, and we never will be, and never care to be so we need to stop holding DOs to the same standards as the MDs were trained. We are not trained the same that is why we don’t take the same boards; we are very different!

We must keep our identity especially when big government and national medical organizations are forcing us down one pathway. Continue reading

Reconnecting the patient-physician relationship

Primary care, like osteopathic family medicine with OMM, is an amazing and diverse specialty. It takes time to listen, see and palpate a patient to help treat disease and maintain optimal health. The government, insurance industry, malpractice attorneys and hospitals have made this ideal practice impossible and nearly extinct. More than half of a DOs and their staffs time is taken up with government compliance measures and insurance red tape. The primary answer is reconnecting the patient-physician relationship without third parties in a direct primary care DPC model.

Best wishes for good health,
Craig M. Wax, DO
Family physician, Editorial Board of Medical Economics
Host of Your Health Matters
Rowan Radio 89.7 WGLS FM
http://wgls.rowan.edu/?feed=YOUR_HEALTH_MATTERS
Twitter @drcraigwax
Independent Physicians For Patient independence @IP4PI

We were promised that board certifications would never be misused

Dr. Carlisle Holland sent us a look at the history of Osteopathic board certification:

I was a professor at TCOM during the period when board certification in general-family  practice and OMM were developed. Even then, there was discussion about whether or not such certifications could be used against physicians to deny or restrict privileges to practice or gain privileges to use some hospitals. During that period the AMA was still denying full reciprocity with DOs and DO post-doc education programs, so our profession created boards that were of comparable academic rigor to be certain that DO boards were at a parity with MD boards in specialties, BUT with the recognized need to include  Osteopathic information and practice methods in addition to the MD material.

Continue reading