Recertification: a test publisher’s attempt to take over authority in medicine

Guest post from Carlisle Holland, D.O.

The change to requiring recertification was demanded at the time by the younger generation of graduates, not the idea of those who had board certification for life. The cut off of requiring it was cited as unfair at the time, but the ‘higher standards’ were deemed worth the period of adjustment to such a change, as board certification was considered an intellectual achievement in itself, and worthy of the credit for knowing the information that well, a credential.

The recertification was a change in the intent of board certification itself and a perversion of its meaning. And it does not prove proficiency nor competency in a specialty to pass retesting every few years. What if they pass it and do not keep retaking it? Board Certified no more? And it confuses the meaning of Board Certified and changes it from a Lifetime Achievement like a Medical Degree, a CREDENTIAL, into a Temporary Pass, which is not an intellectual achievement, but a carrot-stick to force physicians to attend medical
meetings these organizations run. Continue reading

OMT – Is there an app for that?

I had a student who wanted to create an app for PAs and NPs with counterstrain positioning, codes, and paymehts electronic records and insurance coding send all rolled into one so non-DOs can use and code for OMT(osteopathic manual treatment).

As his teacher, I was more than a little disappointed. This ‘all you gotta do’ attitude and get rich quick off creating an osteopathic app was shallow and disrespectful of Osteopathic practices and I refused to participate. As a D.O., our students get 1000 extra hours of osteopathic principles, practices and treatment experience than our other physician colleagues.  We are in a period where this type activity will increase and trivialize the value of OMT if THIS is what it comes to mean. By sheer volume this over simplified version of OMT could become what they think it IS. This is dangerous and we should issue policy and position statements carefully as a profession.

I knew this type activity was in the works, so I am not surprised, but I am a little dismayed that THIS is what has come to Osteopathy.

Carlisle Holland, D.O.
Holonomic Institute
Sebastopol, California 95472
Holonomics are the Principles of Integrative Medicine

 

We were promised that board certifications would never be misused

Dr. Carlisle Holland sent us a look at the history of Osteopathic board certification:

I was a professor at TCOM during the period when board certification in general-family  practice and OMM were developed. Even then, there was discussion about whether or not such certifications could be used against physicians to deny or restrict privileges to practice or gain privileges to use some hospitals. During that period the AMA was still denying full reciprocity with DOs and DO post-doc education programs, so our profession created boards that were of comparable academic rigor to be certain that DO boards were at a parity with MD boards in specialties, BUT with the recognized need to include  Osteopathic information and practice methods in addition to the MD material.

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