Opting-out of Medicare seems like a better idea every day – for doctors and patients

Twila Brase, President of Citizen’s For Health Freedom writes in:

I’m doing a little “light reading.” See page 193 – 198 of the 2016 Medicare Trustee’s Report:

https://www.cms.gov/Research-Statistics-Data-and-Systems/Statistics-Trends-and-Reports/ReportsTrustFunds/Downloads/TR2016.pdf

Two quotes:

By the end of the long-range projection period, payment rates for affected providers would be about 57 percent lower than their level in the absence of these reductions. Currently, the Medicare payment rates for inpatient hospital services have declined to about 61 percent of those paid by private health insurance.97 …

It is conceivable that health care providers could improve their productivity, reduce wasteful expenditures, and take other steps to keep their cost growth within the bounds imposed by the Medicare price limitations. For such efforts to be successful in the long range, however, providers would have to generate and sustain unprecedented levels of productivity gains—a very challenging and uncertain prospect.

Opting-out of Medicare seems like a better idea every day – for doctors and patients. 

If you’re a cash-based third-party-free practice, I invite you to join CCHF’s new “Wedge of Health Freedom,” an identified free-trade zone in the U.S. and an online site for patients and doctors to join together to break free.
 
See videos of Dr. Brenda Arnett and Dr. Alieta Eck talking at our launch in D.C. www.JointheWedge.com

Twila Brase RN, PHN
President and Co-founder
Citizens’ Council for Health Freedom (CCHF)
161 St. Anthony Ave, Ste. 923, Saint Paul, MN 55103

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A Call for AOBA to Return to Lifetime Certification – No OCC

A friend of IP4PI writes in:

I would like to take few moments of your time and share with you some ideas on MOC/OCC and board re-certification exams. As a fellow physician and a Son of Dr. A.T. Still, we all share similar concerns. Our burden is to be true and faithful to our profession and to serve the needs of our patients honestly.

As an Osteopathic Physician like many in my situation, I completed my Osteopathic Internship, and participated in an ACGME anesthesia residency program which makes us uniquely qualified to be board certified by the AOA AOBA, ABMS ABA and The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, FRCPC (Canada). All three are fully respected and recognized in the USA. As a matter of fact, in my training program at USC we had many doctors from Canada who were certified by the FRCPC and were fully incorporated with a full Professorship status. The FRCPC has always been a Life-Time board certification process. Now, recently, last year, ABA has also re-adopted the Life-Time board certification process and dropped the EVERY-10-YEARS re-certification exam. Continue reading

Be heard in Congress on MACRA – Submit testimony to Senate Finance Committee

On, July 13, 2016, The U.S. Senate Committee on Finance held a hearing on MACRA implementation, with Andrew Slavitt testifying.

Any individual or organization wanting to present their views for inclusion in the hearing record should submit a typewritten, single-spaced statement, not exceeding 10 pages in length. Title and date of the hearing, and the full name and address of the individual or organization must appear on the first page of the statement. Statements must be received no later than two weeks following the conclusion of the hearing.

Statements should be mailed (not faxed) to:

Senate Committee on Finance
Attn. Editorial and Document Section
Rm. SD-219
Dirksen Senate Office Bldg.
Washington, DC 20510-6200

Eliminating the six degrees of patient-physician separation

By Craig M. Wax, DO

Parties and special interests within the US federal government have been trying to passively and actively control the health and welfare of its citizens for a century. With the War Labor Board’s wage and price controls instituted in 1943 during WWII, the US federal government first warped both the employer/employee workplace and healthcare by firmly establishing health insurance as a employee “benefit” in lieu of salary. The premiums were paid with pretax dollars by a combination of the employer and employee.

This gave the employer the power to choose the coverage based on the employer’s needs and wants, not the end user employees needs and wants. This was the first degree of separation.

The insurance premium was used as a bet against the employee getting sick. Today, the insurance companies and other third parties make money by denying the healthcare payment for services, studies, tests and medications. After the insurance company processes healthcare provider claims, they make restrictive and sometimes arbitrary decisions about whether to fund the care, tests and medications. This leaves the patient on the hook for associated costs, despite the insurance premium already paid. This is the second degree of separation. Continue reading